Bitcoins – Coins For the Cryptocracy

People all over the political spectrum are pushing bitcoins again.

I explained earlier why I felt you should avoid them. When I did, I withheld any reasoning except the most logical and self-evident.

Short version:

You can accomplish everything that bitcoins can achieve with good old cash. And you don’t need electricity, internet, computers, devices, and security software when you use cash.

Second, if governments hate cash for its secrecy, why are they ignoring or pushing cryptocurrencies, which are supposedly even more secretive?

Makes no sense, does it?

The problem with bitcoins is they provide a solution for what isn’t a problem.

Secrecy isn’t a problem.

Secrecy can be achieved as is, if you set your mind on it.

The real problem is that every increase in secrecy augments the power of the cryptocracy – the unholy alliance of the spy agencies, criminals, and criminal financial cartels.

These are the forces that actually control our lives.

The criminal ruling class loves bitcoin because they know they have the power to exploit it fully. The ordinary chump just thinks he does.

As for Satoshi Nakamto, there’s no such person. It’s a made-up name, even though it has a meaning. A sinister one that gives the game away.

Don’t let clever people fool you into thinking it’s a real person.

They are probably being compensated for saying so.

Remember, practically every political site of any size on the web is in bed with intelligence. When they are not, they get pruned regularly.

Just see what happened to me here.

Bitcoin comes out of Israeli cryptographic research. The details I don’t know, but that’s generally accurate.

It’s not about saving anyone. It’s about enacting the kabbalist’s vision on earth.

That vision demands that the Anglo-Judaic Western powers rule the world through decentralized systems.

Those who are pushing bitcoin are on board that agenda.

I am too busy recovering from the latest body-blow from the cryptocracy to spell it out better just now.

But I will get to it.

If you want to gamble, go ahead.

But if you adopt bitcoins because you think your life will become opaque to the powers-that-be, you might want to rethink that.

The only way to hide anything done on your computer is to turn it off, smash the hard drive into metal dust, and throw it into a nuclear waste site.

But even then, there are still the servers and the other fellows’ computers.

Not to mention advances in technology or mathematics that will turn bitcoins invulnerability into mush.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burqa Bans and Muslim Identification

Lew Rockwell makes a most peculiar comment:

Thousands of Muslims Protest Burqa Ban in Austria

I agree. Not only is it an offense against self-ownership, it’s a leftist attempt to hide the deliberate de-Austrianization of Austria. “

What? A leading libertarian activist claims that once the burqa is banned, you won’t be able to tell an Austrian….from a Muslim.

But here’s what.

Austrian is a type of nationality. Muslim refers to religious belief. The two are apples and oranges…or, more accurately, apples and cut flowers.

Two. Can anyone really tell nationality from an item of clothing?

Are there no French citizens in burkas?

Three. If, by Austrian, Rockwell meant “white” Austrian, well, a lot of Muslims from the Middle East are whiter than Europeans and a lot of native-born Austrians are dark-skinned, since they are second or third-generation immigrants.

Four. Even native-born non-immigrant Caucasian Austrians can be Muslims.

Five. Do all Muslims wear burqas? If the burqa were banned, Muslims who would have worn them, would still probably be identifiable as Muslims, from head-scarves, for instance.

Unless Rockwell really thinks that a ban on burqas means conservative Muslim women in Austria  will now be running around in shorts and tank-tops.

Does he really think that?

Rockwell is a smart guy.

So when I read such loopy arguments, I have to suspect some deeper agenda.

Banning the burka is a bad idea because it is a radical intrusion of the state into the realm of personal choice in an area where there is no valid community interest at stake that might conceivable justify some  voluntary compromise between individual choice and community interest.
A burqa could be a security threat, for example. In that case, the ban should be not on the burqa but more generally on any item of clothing that covers the face and body in such a way to make an interlocuter clearly vulnerable to assault in a limited number of  clearly defined public spaces.
But, in general, I think a ban on something that doesn’t obviously pose a threat to anyone else’s freedom or life is a bad way to go.

 

CDC Plagiarizes Indian Scientist’s Litchi Diagnosis

Yet more evidence of the extent of brazen IP theft from non-Western, especially developing Asian countries,  in elite Western institutions, this time involving Western and Indian-origin scientists at the Center for Disease Control in the US, deploying the resources of the Indian government to poach from Indian scientists:

The story began in 2013 when, faced with recurrent deaths of children due to a mysterious brain disease in litchi-harvesting belts of Muzaffarpur, the Bihar government and the health ministry of the central government turned to veteran virologist Dr T Jacob John. They could not have got a better expert: Dr John, since his MBBS way back in 1958, followed by a PhD in 1976, has a long and distinguished career in public health. In a way, he was the brain behind the polio vaccination campaign.

What could be the cause of deaths? The prime suspect was some yet-to-be-identified virus. The next suspect was the fruit itself, that is, some substance in it – it could be a toxin in litchi or something in the pesticide used. Other suspects were bats which were eating litchis and hence probably passing on some disease to children who ate the bat-eaten litchis. The common factor to all deaths was that the children were dying in the litchi-belt during the litchi harvesting season of May and June, recalls Dr John.

He camped at Muzaffarpur, met villagers and began his work. He ruled out the virus angle and was zeroing in on a chemical within litchi. “A similar disease was caused by another fruit called ackee that belongs to the same plant family as litchi. This disease was metabolic and was called hypoglycaemic encephalopathy, or ‘Jamaican vomiting sickness’. So I was able to rule out virus in the very beginning,” he says.

His hunch was that it was worth looking for a toxin within the fruit. He suggested this in a report in May 2014 – in the leading journal of its kind in India, Current Science, published by the Current Science Association in collaboration with the Indian Academy of Sciences. He and his co-researcher, Mukul Das, wrote:
“In animal experiments, MCPA (the hypoglycin found in ackee) and MCPG (the hypoglycin in litchi) have been shown to induce encephalopathy and hypoglycaemia. Encephalopathy is explained by the mitochondrial inhibition of fatty acid-oxidation and accumulation of toxic metabolites. Our hypothesis is that the Muzaffarpur AES is caused by MCPG in lychee. However, we do not know if it is present only in the seed or also in the edible fruit flesh and if unripe lychee has more MCPG than ripe fruits.”
Their conclusion: “…tightly  restricted seasonality and geographic distribution as well as sparing of children below 2 years support the diagnosis of acute non-infectious encephalopathy as against viral encephalitis.”

In September 2014, doctors John, Das and Arun Shah published further findings on the toxin hypothesis in the same journal.
They, however, were in for a shock when they found the same findings reproduced in an American journal a few months later – without any credit, acknowledgement or reference to their research.

Akash Srivastava, who is with the National Centre for Disease Control of the health ministry, along with a team of researchers published this set of findings in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), a journal published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the US government. The March 2015 report arrived at the same conclusion, that the brain disease among children in Muzaffarpur was not caused by a virus but by some toxin within litchi seeds or fruit, and the condition was hence not a viral disease but a metabolic disorder called hypoglycaemic encephalopathy.

Dr John and his co-authors took up the matter in a letter published in Current Science in September 2015. It asked: “Publishing on hypoglycemic encephalopathy, borrowing information without giving credit: Is Current Science invisible?”

They noted, “Annual seasonal outbreaks of what was popularly called acute encephalitis syndrome in Muzaffarpur, Bihar were clinically diagnosed in 2013 by us as non-infectious, toxic, hypoglycemic encephalopathy… The toxin was pinpointed as methylenecyclopropylglycine (MCPG). Thus, our first publication in May 2014 in Current Science was a breakthrough after many groups of investigators had failed for many years to diagnose the disease or provide any plausible causative associations.

“In 2014, we confirmed with clinical evidences that the disease is indeed hypoglycemic encephalopathy and the patients could be saved with prompt correction of hypoglycemia. These results were published, again in Current Science, in August 2014.” But in January 2015, MMWR came out with a report by a large group of investigators, stating that the disease is acute hypoglycemic encephalopathy with putative association with litchi, as if they were the first to arrive at such a conclusion.”

“Our 2013 investigations which appeared in May 2014 in Current Science were a watershed. But the studies of Shrivastava et al published in January 2015 in MMWR have not cited our earlier contributions – one reason could be that Current Science is invisible in the usual biomedical literature surveys. However, when we conducted a simple literature search through a popular search engine, we found references to both our papers.”

When Governance Now contacted  MMWR, its executive editor Charlotte Kent replied promptly on December 2 saying that matter would be investigated. “We received your two emails from today about the MMWR report, “Outbreaks of Unexplained Neurologic Illness – Muzaffapur, India, 2013-14”. We are planning on investigating the concern you raised,” she said in an email. MMWR has not sent any further information on the matter since then. Srivastava, meanwhile, did not reply to the emailed queries.

Several questions are raised by this incident, especially since the parallel research published by CDC was also done with help of Indian government bodies.

Dr John also rues the fact that this episode pits Indian scientists against each other. He says that ultimately it proves that Indians can do their research and reach the truth without external help. However, he adds that distortion of truth does leave a bitter taste in the mouth and is just not done in science.

An ethical scientist would not claim credit for someone else’s work, says the veteran virologist.

 

Dear Tamil Nadu Police, Please Do Not Arrest Me But…

Dear Tamil Nadu police, please do not arrest me but please do take a look at this list of mainstream Indian media reports about illness and death suffered immediately after vaccinations in India.

Yes, whale.to is considered a conspiracy site and a lot worse, but that link is only a list.

Can a list of mainstream reports be considered conspiracy-mongering?

Please do also look at the report of the chief of pediatrics at St. Stephens Hospital in Delhi and consider whether his measured comments and research on combination vaccines and their dangers amount to “panic messages” on social media.

Dr. Puliyel has also exposed the dangers of indigenous rotavirus vaccines and contested the government’s figures on the number of Indian children suffering from rotavirus diarrhoea.

If we  can worry about merely irritating bulls in villages in South India, surely parents can worry about their precious young children being given worrisome combo vaccines without threats of arrest.

 

 

 

 

Tamil Nadu Government Threatens Arrest Of Anti-Vaxxers

Times of India:

The state health department has threatened to initiate legal action against those sending panic messages advising people to boycott the coming massive measles-rubella vaccine drive in which nearly 1.8 crore children between 9 months and 15 years will be vaccinated in schools and primary health centres from February 6.

[Lila: around 237,000 children]

The department has the powers to persuade parents to vaccinate their children, said director of public health Dr K Kolandaisamy.

In the past one week, there has been a flood of messages on social media urging parents not to send their children for vaccination in schools and some suggest that they should not send their children to school on days scheduled for vaccinations……

“We are well within our powers even to arrest people who are a hindrance to the success of this scheme. We are working with the cybercrime team to track such panic messages. The scheme is being launched to eliminate the virus from the environment,” he said.”