Libertarian Republic On Steve Bannon’s Art Of The “New Deal”

Libertarian Republic gets it right:

Taking Bannon at his own word, and in the context of 1930s, it sounds a lot like the rhetoric coming from Germany pre-World War II. His rhetoric matches the anger, scapegoating, and emotional ploys spoken in the early days of Adolf Hitler‘s rise.

While this may seem pejorative, or hyperbolic, let us look at how the Mises Institute, an Austrian Economic think tank, explains 1930 Germany’s economic situation.

In the 1930s, Hitler was widely viewed as just another protectionist central planner who recognized the supposed failure of the free market and the need for nationally guided economic development. Proto-Keynesian socialist economist Joan Robinson wrote that “Hitler found a cure against unemployment before Keynes was finished explaining it.”

What were those economic policies? He suspended the gold standard, embarked on huge public-works programs like autobahns, protected industry from foreign competition, expanded credit, instituted jobs programs, bullied the private sector on prices and production decisions, vastly expanded the military, enforced capital controls, instituted family planning, penalized smoking, brought about national healthcare and unemployment insurance, imposed education standards, and eventually ran huge deficits. The Nazi interventionist program was essential to the regime’s rejection of the market economy and its embrace of socialism in one country.

Now compare that to how Bannon and Trump have described their plans and vision for having won the White House.

  1. 1 Trillion Dollar Infrastructure matches the huge public works programs
  2. “The globalists gutted the American working class and created a middle class in Asia,”  along with Trumps promises to coerce business back into the US, matches protection of industry from foreign competition,
  3. “With negative interest rates throughout the world, it’s the greatest opportunity to rebuild everything,” added to Trumps call to continue borrowing, matches expanding credit and the continuance of large deficits
  4. “Rebuild everything. Shipyards, iron works, get them all jacked up,” matches the instituted jobs programs
  5. Trumps possible control of capital through protectionist trade.
  6. The comment by Bannon about being in power for the next “50 years” sounds awfully similar to the how Nazi’s described the Third Reich. “It is our will that this state shall endure for a thousand years. We are happy to know that the future is ours entirely!” – Triumph of Will (1935)

This not to say that Bannon or Trump should be compared to Nazis or that they have come close to committing the acts against humanity that occurred in that period of history. Rather it is a simple question which compares the rhetoric being used by the two administrations in their rise to power. After all, this perspective is a simple look back at history, so as to learn from it and utilize it to spot potential issues in the future. If we willfully ignore details, even if just as a safety measure, then we leave ourselves at risk of missing what could’ve been right under our nose. Famed philosopher George Santayana once said, “Those that fail to learn from history, are doomed to repeat it.”

PETA’s “Animal Ethics” Is Mass Slaughter Of Pets

Excerpted from “PETA’s Death Cult Part III” 

“Ingrid Newkirk has unapologetically described herself as a tyrant: “‘This is not a democratic organization,’ she said. ‘I never pretended that it was. I don’t know where exactly it would go if it were a democracy. And I am not willing to give it a try.’”

One place it might go: towards ending PETA’s mass slaughter of dogs and cats. It’s hard to imagine that every one of her employees feels all warm and fuzzy about working for an outfit that has — in one blood-soaked location — killed 27,561 pets.

Newkirk just hates it when you describe her pet organization as a cult: “I can’t stand to hear that word,” she told Michael Specter of the New Yorker. “If you put that cult stuff in, nobody will take what we do seriously.”

So I’ll let you come up with a word of your own, keeping the following information in mind.

If you intern at PETA’s headquarters in Norfolk, you are expected to condone the killing of shelter animals. On the official application (which you can download here), the only question that requires a response longer than a couple of factual words is:

Have a look at our Web site, review our stance on euthanasia, and let me know if you agree or disagree with it and why.

Now perhaps that means they hope to take in clever interns who disagree with them, so that they might have fruitful and interesting conversations while they tend to the cheerful business of killing animals.

The chances of this are small. They are even smaller than the chances of a healthy kitten surviving PETA’s headquarters. Three percent smaller, to be precise. (Do the math: 97 percent of animals delivered into PETA’s care are summarily slaughtered; hence a kitten does in fact have a 3 percent chance of dodging Ingrid’s hypodermic.)”

NASA Admits Global Warming Fraud

H/T to Lew Rockwell on this gem:

NASA has actually admitted that there may be a link between the solar climate and the earth climate. “[In] recent years, researchers have considered the possibility that the sun plays a role in global warming. After all, the sun is the main source of heat for our planet,” Nasa confirmed. Despite the constant stories of how recent years have been the hottest, historically, NASA has estimated that four of the 10 hottest years in the U.S. were actually during the 1930s, with 1934 the hottest of all. This was the Dust Bowl; the combination of vast dust storms created by drought and hot weather.

CDIAC

The branch of research looking at the ice core samples to document climate for thousands of years has established the major solar cycle of about 300 years. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which has the ice core data back 800,000 years, is being shut down as of September 2017 (800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2)).

800000 carbon

The data clearly establishes that there has always been a cycle to CO2 long before man’s industrial age. This is data government wants to hide. As along as they can pretend CO2 has never risen in the past before 1950, then they can tax the air and pretend it’s to prevent climate change. Moreover, while we can clean the air with regulation as we have done, under global warming, they allow “credits” to pollute as long as you pay the government. It is the ultimate scam where they get to tax pollution and people cheer rather than clean up anything.”

List of NGO’s banned in India

From Karmayog.org:

Blacklisted NGOs

The 600 non-governmental organizations banned by the government up to March this year were funded by the Council for Advancement of People’s Action and Rural Technology, which works as a liaison between the government and NGOs. The council formulates projects and selects NGOs that can implement them. It also funds projects proposed by NGOs in different states, to take care of various development-related tasks. The blacklisted NGOs will not be allowed to start functioning again.

Andhra Pradesh (175), Bihar (123), Tamil Nadu(71), Uttar Pradesh (69) and Rajasthan (31) are the top five states where the blacklisted NGOs are based. Karnataka (22), West Bengal (21), Delhi(21), Haryana (20), Orissa (19) and Maharashtra (19) are in the top 10 states.

The full list of Blacklisted NGOs is at Map & State wise List of Blacklisted NGOs .”

I have a mixed to positive reaction to this. On one hand, a lot of NGO’s are certainly subversive agents of the globalist cabal.  I also question why they should direct government policies and projects.

On the other hand, a blanket banning of NGO’s seems to thrown the baby out with the bath-water.

Again, there is need for looking at things on a case-by-case basis, instead of going in for broad, sweeping policies that damage the good actors along with the bad.

In addition, top-down NGO’s seem to be a kind of contradiction in terms. The whole point of being non-governmental is missed when the NGOs act WITH the central government, rather than independently of them, or at least, only with local governments.

 

Millets Preferable To Quinoa In India

There is a craze in India for adopting the organic alternative grains that are fashionable among American consumers.

The problem is that those grains, like quinoa, are mostly imported from central and southern America, regions that are well within the economic reach of well-to-do America, but are a ridiculous form of ostentatious consumption for India.

Living on the other side of the globe, with far less purchasing power, and with many more constraints of  soil, land, technology, and climate, Indians have to be smarter than this.

India already has a whole range of traditional cereals that are far more nutritious and far easier to produce than polished rice:

Alternative.in:

When seeing nicely packaged ragi biscuits in the health section of supermarkets, one could almost get the impression that millets are indeed becoming fashionable again. However, the statistics speak a different language: Changes in consumption trends over the past decades, coupled with state policies that favour rice and wheat, have led to a sharp decline in millet production and consumption.

In the 1950s, the area under millet cultivation in India exceeded the area cultivated under either rice or wheat, and millets made up 40% of all cultivated grains. However, in the early 1970s, rice overtook millets, and in the early 1990s so did wheat. Since the Green Revolution, the production of rice and wheat was boosted by 125% and 285% respectively, and the production of millets declined by -2.4%.

Although India is still the top millet producing country in the world, by 2006, the millet growing area was only half that of rice, and one fifth less than wheat. The share of millets in total grain production had dropped from 40% to 20%. This has dire agricultural, environmental and nutritional consequences.

Not just urban food preferences, state policies also play a major role in the shift of consumption habits. For instance, the Public Distribution System has promoted rice and wheat uniformly across India, completely disregarding local climatic conditions, agricultural traditions and food cultures. Polished rice became the cheapest and most readily available foodgrain, and as a consequence the most popular one. The change in preferences was aggravated by notions of cleanliness, purity and sophistication of refined grains versus the more down-to-earth “coarse” grains.

Millets contain a high amount of fibre, which earned them the derogatory name “coarse grains” and often degrades them to animal feed. However, in a time where urban consumers tend to go overboard on refined products, the extra fibre in millets might just be a great boon. Fibre is essential not just for good digestion and a healthy bowel; it also has a positive impact on blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

Furthermore, millets are richer in several nutrients than rice, wheat or corn. For instance, they are rich in B-vitamins such as niacin, B6 and folic acid, as well as calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, zinc and beta carotene. Each millet variety has a different nutritional profile. The table below compares several millets, wheat and rice with regard to selected essential nutrients. Millets are also ideal for people suffering from gluten-intolerance.

Millets are truly miraculous grains in terms of their nutritional value, and even more so in terms of their humble requirements as agricultural crops. They are ideal for rainfed farming systems – the majority of India’s small and marginal farms. The rainfall requirement of millets is only 30% of that of rice. While it takes an average 4,000 litres of water to grow 1 kg of rice, millets grow without any irrigation. Millets can withstand droughts, and they grow well in poor soils, some of them even in acidic, saline or sandy soils. Traditional millet farming systems are inherently biodiverse and include other important staples such as pulses and oilseeds. They are usually grown organically, as millets do not require chemical pesticides and fertilizer.

Organizations that promote millet cultivation and consumption for security of food, nutrition, fodder, fibre, health, livelihoods and ecology across India are joined in the Millet Network of India (MINI), an alliance of over farmer organizations, scientists, civil society groups and individuals.

Millets are richer in several nutrients than rice, wheat or corn. Pic: Flickr, Creative Commons

Millets are available in organic stores, from organic online retailers, in supermarkets and various other shops. They can easily be integrated into any kind of diet.

Here’s how you can use millets at home:

•Mix millets with other grains or use by themselves like rice
Make soft and tasty idlis from whole jowar
•Add some millets to your dosa batter
•Enjoy puffed jowar as a snack, breakfast cereal or sprinkled on salads for a nice crunch
Use foxtail millet rava for a more nutririous upma
•Add millet flours to rotis; for cakes and raised breads, mix them with wheat flour, as millets do not contain gluten.”